Mary Isbell’s Profile

Active 4 days, 19 hours ago
Mary Isbell

Courses

Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies

Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies

This course is designed to help you turn observations and ideas into research projects that incorporate methodologies from multiple disciplines. My goal is to help you develop and hone skills this semester that you can use in university courses and in your life beyond the university, whether that be through hobbies or professional pursuits. I’m going to guide you by sharing interdisciplinary projects that I’m currently working on and ask you to chronicle your experiences and—potentially—share them with future students of this course. The first step is to decide what you’re interested in pursuing, and we’ll do this by thinking about the communities you belong to and the challenges impacting those communities.

Modernisms

Modernisms

This course is meant to be “a study of important British writers from the Romantic era to the present,” but I propose that we approach it as an opportunity to consider the meaning of “modern” as a classification of writing. Two definitions of modern from the OED: “being in existence at this time” and “characterized by a departure from or a repudiation of accepted or traditional styles and values” suggest that the creative works considered modern are likely always changing. This is not to be confused with capital “M” movements, groups, or styles like Modernist literature or Modern art. These are names given to categories created by scholars and critics making sense of creative works (often after the fact). I’ve learned that Modernist literature can feel far from modern to students in 2024. We’re going to keep this contradiction in the back of our minds this semester as we focus on literary innovations that emerged in the last two hundred or so years.

Seminar in Academic Inquiry and Writing

Seminar in Academic Inquiry and Writing

Syllabus and assignments for students enrolled in Dr. Isbell’s Seminar in Academic Inquiry and Writing

Representations of Nature (CC 9.1)

Representations of Nature (CC 9.1)

As humans, we create representations of nature in a wide range of media and for many different purposes. Examples in the creative arts include travel writing, landscape painting, field recordings of birds, and wildlife documentaries. Representations of nature for the purposes of scientific understanding include the naming of plant and animal species and illustrations of biological processes. Scientific theories have emerged alongside photographs captured with powerful microscopes and telescopes. Through the analysis of works combining visual, written, and sonic elements, this course will explore the limits of human perception and expression in representing the natural world.

Algorithms and the Arts

Algorithms and the Arts

Syllabus and assignments for students enrolled in Dr. Isbell’s course “Algorithms and the Arts”

Projects

The Writing Center

The Writing Center

Visit here for information about The Writing Center such as our hours, how to book an appointment, and common FAQs.

The Connected Core

The Connected Core

The Connected Core makes it easy for students with a variety of interests to find relevant courses that fulfill core requirements. Connected Core courses invite students to draw meaningful connections between the humanities and their lives and future careers. Learning to view the complex problems we face through multiple perspectives encourages students in these courses to design innovative solutions to big, complex problems.

Open Pedagogy at the University of New Haven

Open Pedagogy at the University of New Haven

This site contains information about the open pedagogy fellowship program at the University of New Haven

Schaub Makerspace

Schaub Makerspace

This site contains information about the Schaub makerspace for faculty and students

Arts & Humanities Research Series

Arts & Humanities Research Series

A grassroots research series organized by faculty for faculty