Questions for Common Experience – Plastics – Math & Physics Dept.

Common Experience 2019:

Impact of Plastics

 

Discussion questions for Math & Physics Department Meeting:

 

  1. Earlier today, you heard from five professors, all with different perspectives on plastics. What was the most surprising thing you learned about plastics from these presentations, either positive or negative?

 

  1. Can you see any connections or possible applications of this topic to your field of study?
    1. Or: How do you see your field of study contributing positively or negatively to the plastics issues discussed so far?

 

 

  1. How could you collaborate with your peers from other majors at the university to help solve the plastic problem?

 

  1. Approximately how many plastic bags do you think Americans use in the course of a year?

 

  1. Approximately how many plastic bags do Connecticut residents use in a year?

 

 

  1. What percentage of American plastic bag use are CT residents responsible for?

 

  1. How many bags does the average CT resident use? (What information do you need to answer this?)

 

 

  1. Original estimates indicate a revenue of $55 million over the course of two years. How is this revenue planned to be used?

 

 

  1. At 10 cents per bag, can you estimate how many bags a local Stop n Shop might sell in one day? (What other information might you need to be able to answer this?)
  2. Does the supermarket save money on not providing the plastic bags for free? Explain.

 

  1. Pick a state that you think is doing really well in curbing use of plastics. Explain why you think they are doing well.

 

  1. What else can we do to curb our use of plastics in Connecticut?

 

  1. The issue of excessive plastic is a huge problem, but what is one thing you could do this week to make a positive impact?

 

 

Digital Editions of Valentine and Orson

This TAPAS project was created as a part of the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship in the summer of 2018. My initial focus was on early children’s literature and creating a collection to analyze this literature. While doing reading and primary source research on the subject I found the story of Valentine and Orson (VAO). Because of how unique and interesting not only the story, but also the publication history was I decided to devote my entire project to VAO. In this project my goal was to find, collect, transcribe, and encode as many editions as possible into a single collection. I found over 40 versions that were accessible to me, but was not able to use all of them in my collection. I eventually determined that I would need to select a representative sample of editions.

Please view my TAPAS collection through the link below. I recommend reading the “Introduction” and the
“Encoding Guidelines” first. Please view the files behind the visualization on my GitHub. If you would like to learn more about my step-by-step process for creating a digital edition, please view the “SURF Poster” under the files tab.

Project on TAPAS:

http://www.tapasproject.org/digital-editions-valentine

Project on GitHub:

https://github.com/noorka/SURF2018

Digital Editions of Valentine and Orson

This TAPAS project was created as a part of the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship in the summer of 2018. My initial focus was on early children’s literature and creating a collection to analyze of this literature. While doing reading and primary source research on the subject I found the story of Valentine and Orson (VAO). Because of how unique and the interesting not only the story, but also the publication history was I decided to devote my entire project to VAO. In this project my goal was to find, collect, transcribe, and encode as many editions as possible into a single collection. I found over 40 versions that were accessible to me, but was not able to use all of them in my collection. I eventually determined that I would need to select a representative sample of editions.

Please view my TAPAS collection through the link below. I recommend reading the “Introduction” and the
“Encoding Guidelines” first. Please view the files behind the visualization on my GitHub. If you would like to learn more about my step-by-step process for creating a digital edition, please view the “SURF Poster” under the files tab.

Project on TAPAS:

http://www.tapasproject.org/digital-editions-valentine

Project on GitHub:

https://github.com/noorka/SURF2018

Digital Representation of Narrative Elements in Valentine and Orson

This was my Honors Thesis project presented in May 2019. It utilized the digital editions created in my SURF project as a basis for encoding adaptation and narrative change. In the first stages of the project I was looking for an existing adaptation/ narrative theory that could be used as tags to break down and analyze my stories. I was interested in seeing how the story changed over time and what elements were consistent across all versions of the story. Because I did not find a theory that suited my needs I proposed the theory of narrative blocks. The theory imagines the significant events in a story as the building blocks for that story or version.

Encoding narrative blocks made me consider the limitations of the platform I had been working with (TAPAS) and the constraints of a hierarchical mark-up language (XML). Ultimately the best method for this project was to create a Dynamic Table of Contexts (DToC) with the narrative blocks encoded as if they were index terms. Please view the DToC representation linked below as well as the files behind the visualization on GitHub.

 

Dynamic Table of Contexts for Valentine and Orson:

https://voyant-tools.org/dtoc/?corpus=964f7762ab7859ababfb799eb76dbbbc&docId=7f5b31b8409ffe940bea008289233974

GitHub for Narrative Blocks:

https://github.com/noorka/NarrativeBlocks

Digital Editions of Valentine and Orson

This TAPAS project was created as a part of the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship in the summer of 2018. My initial focus was on early children’s literature and creating a collection to analyze of this literature. While doing reading and primary source research on the subject I found the story of Valentine and Orson (VAO). Because of how unique and the interesting not only the story, but also the publication history was I decided to devote my entire project to VAO. In this project my goal was to find, collect, transcribe, and encode as many editions as possible into a single collection. I found over 40 versions that were accessible to me, but was not able to use all of them in my collection. I eventually determined that I would need to select a representative sample of editions.

Please view my TAPAS collection through the link below. I recommend reading the “Introduction” and the
“Encoding Guidelines” first. If you would like to learn more about my step-by-step process for creating a digital edition, please view the “SURF Poster” under the files tab.

 

http://www.tapasproject.org/digital-editions-valentine

Collaborative Tools

As you have probably figured out already, I believe that we can do quite a lot together as students and teachers. This page will link out to the collaborative tools that students from prior semesters have developed and the tools that we will develop during our time together.

First, please check out the Academic Inquiry Toolbox. This is a resource that Fall 2018 ENGL 1112L initially put together; they combed through Blackboard and selected what they felt was most helpful. There are links to webpages on reading and analyzing texts, the writing process, and research. We also copy/pasted some of the better assignments that I had come up with. The toolbox keeps growing (and probably needs some editing, I won’t lie). If you can think of anything that should be there that isn’t already, certainly let me know!

In Spring 2019 ENGL 1104, ENGL 1112, and 1113 all worked together to develop a Course Dictionary. The idea behind this was to make it easier for students to keep track of vocabulary that they learned in the academic articles they read that would then help them write in the future. It also includes some definitions of words from the essay prompts; students rightfully felt it important to share what “gaps, tensions, ambiguities, difficulties, and contradictions” meant when it came to dealing with “opportunities for conversation”!

Keep your eyes peeled for the up and coming Annotated Bibliography, due out in Fall 2019!